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“Feminist”, it might be one of the most hated and loved words in the modern language. And yet, Adichie explains very clearly why the word and movement are still of the utmost importance.

I’ve never thought of myself as a feminist. Not because I’m not one, I have been for many years, but mostly because I never realised completely what a feminist was exactly. To this day it’s still unclear to me, as it doesn’t make sense that not everyone would fight for equality. However, reading We should all be feminists cleared up a lot of things and therefore it should be mandatory for everyone no matter the gender.

Word
We should all be feminists
got me thinking about why “feminist” is such a loaded term. It might be because, thanks to the beloved internet, the word got associated with angry women. And from there on angry women spiraled to frustrated and hateful women. So apparently, I am a dislikeable person simply because I ask questions about the way the world still seems divided in gender-based biases. It’s funny how that works… Or seems to work, at least. Adichie mentions the same issues with the word feminist in the little booklet that came out of the TedTalk she held about the subject. But after that she dives into proving that feminism has nothing to do with frustration or hate, and all the more with anger that should have been released centuries ago.

Questions
Feminism revolves around questions. Questions we should ask ourselves, questions we should ask each other, and questions we should ask the upcoming generations. When divided in these three categories, there is a clear pattern on how the future has to move to create equality for everyone. Not just women, not just man. We don’t want to flip the scales, we just want to balance them. And that balance will be in benefit for men as well as women as it would make stereotypes obsolete. Men can cry and show emotions, and women can take charge and take their careers to the max. It is 2019 for f***’s sake, shouldn’t it be high time we curb all those boxes that we shove each other in?

We should all be feminists is not an easy read. It will leave you thinking, confused, wondering, and a tad bitter about the current state of affairs. But that’s exactly what you want. This little booklet will give you a fighting spirit, ready to change the world.

We should all be feminists
What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay – adapted from her much-viewed Tedx talk of the same name – by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of ‘Americanah‘ and ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’. With humour and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century – one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviours that marginalise women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie / HarperCollins UK

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